Technical report of the Oceanographic Cruise Profrentes-00 in the Nayarit coast (january 20-21, 2016)

E. A. Inda-Díaz1*; C. A. Romero-Bañuelos2; J. Cepeda-Morales3; O. U. Hernández Almeida1; J. Largier4; T. S. Bernal-Jaspeado5

1. Laboratorio de Oceanografía Biológica. Edificio CEMIC-01 Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. Cd. de la Cultura S/N. Colonia Centro. Tepic, Nayarit. C.P. 63000. México., Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Laboratorio de Oceanografía Biológica, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit,

<city>Tepic</city>
<state>Nayarit</state>
<postal-code>63000</postal-code>
, Mexico , 2. Laboratorio de Toxicología Ambiental. Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. Cd. de la Cultura S/N. Colonia Centro. Tepic, Nayarit. C.P. 63000. México., Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Laboratorio de Toxicología Ambiental, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit,
<city>Tepic</city>
<state>Nayarit</state>
<postal-code>63000</postal-code>
, Mexico ,
3. Laboratorio de Percepción Remota Satelital de Ecosistemas. Centro Nayarita de Innovación y Transferencia Tecnológica A.C. (CENIT2). Calle 3 esquina con Av. 9 s/n. Ciudad Industrial. Tepic, Nayarit. C.P. 63173. México., Laboratorio de Percepción Remota Satelital de Ecosistemas, Centro Nayarita de Innovación y Transferencia Tecnológica A.C.,
<city>Tepic</city>
<state>Nayarit</state>
<postal-code>63173</postal-code>
, México ,
4. Bodega Marine Laboratory. 2099 Westshore Rd. Bodega Bay, CA 94923. United States of America., Bodega Marine Laboratory,
<state>CA</state>
<postal-code>94923</postal-code>
, United States of America ,
5. Programa de Biología. Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. Carretera Tepic-Compostela Km. 9. Xalisco, Nayarit. C.P. 63780. México., Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Programa de Biología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit,
<state>Nayarit</state>
<postal-code>63780</postal-code>
, Mexico

Correspondence: *. Corresponding Author: Emilio A. Inda-Díaz.Laboratorio de Oceanografía Biológica. Edificio CEMIC-01. Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. Cd. de la Cultura S/N. Colonia Centro. Tepic, Nayarit. C.P. 63000 Teléfono: + 52 311 2118800 ext. 8916. E-mail: E-mail:


Abstract

Hydrographic data from 8 CTD stations and 4 transects are reported. The oceanographic campaign PROFRENTES-00 took place from January 20th to 21st 2016 on board of the RV ‘Don Emilio M. González’ of the University of Nayarit, around the Santiago river plume in front of its mouth ‘Boca del Asadero’. This sampling was part of the project ‘Physical-biological processes in river plume fronts of the Mexican Pacific’ (Conacyt: I010/532/2014 MOD.ORD/42/2014 CB-2014-01 241916). Vertical profiles for each station are reported, physical variables measured were temperature, salinity, density anomaly, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and turbidity; as well as surface transects of continuous measurements of the same variables.

Received: 2017 October 16; Accepted: 2017 December 15

revbio. 2020 Mar 22; 5: e376
doi: 10.15741/revbio.05.e376

Keywords: Key words: Prospection, January 2016 hydrographic data, Santiago river plume and fronts, Nayarit’s continental shelf.

Introduction

The oceanographic campaing on board R/V Don Emilio M. González (property of Autonomous University of Nayarit) was conducted during January 20th and 21st 2016 nearby Santiago river plume zone in front of ‘Boca del Asadero’. As part of the project ‘Physical-biological processes in river plume fronts of the Mexican Pacific’ (Conacyt: I010/532/2014 MOD. ORD/42/2014 CB-2014-01 241916), it was named PROFRENTES-00.

The river plume fronts, hydrographic structures formed by continental freshwater systems run-offs’ to the sea, are key processes on coastal productivity, hydrological cycle, and thermodynamics stability of coastal seas (Martínez-Flores et al., 2011). The fronts between the plumes and adjacent waters in transition zones highly influence circulation, productivity, sediment dynamics, and water quality in coastal zones, despite the importance for several processes and biological communities, those are not completely understood (Largier, 1993).

The incomparable potential capacity to transport terrigenous sediments, nutrients and pollutants is under the influence of river flow, tides, and meteorological conditions. The river mouths near areas are usually highly productive, and these could sustain commercial fisheries (Pritchard, 2000). Such frontal zones concentrate high phytoplankton biomass (Franks, 1992) that could promote energy transfer to upper trophic levels (as zooplankton and minor pelagic fishes). On the other hand, the accumulation and availability of plankton in frontal zones has been widely documented, both due to in situ production and accumulation by convergence in the front (Brandt, 1993), suggesting that transport processes are very important.

Among other processes, fronts influencea < retention and recruitment of planktonic larvae of commercial interest organisms such as fish, mollusks (bivalves, cephalopods, and gastropods), and crustaceans (Largier, 1993). So, river plume fronts are very important for coastal productivity, including fisheries.

In the Gulf of California, on southern continental shelf in front of Sinaloa and Nayarit, the occurrence of these fronts has been documented through satellite images (Martínez-Flores et al., 2011), but also through foam accumulation, floating material, fish and bird activity, and the presence of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) which indicates a high concentration of zooplankton biomass given their dietary needs (Murillo-Olmeda, 2010; Ketchum et al., 2012).

Project aim

The overall objective of the project is to describe the physical structure of the Santiago river plume, chlorophyll and nutrients concentration, large phytoplankton groups, zooplankton biomass, and fish larvae abundance and community structure. The hydrographic and biological data from this oceanographic campaign will be used in undergrad and grad thesis, as well as scientific publications.

The first objective of this campaign was prospection and recognition of physical and biological variables in the plume area of Santiago river. The second objective was to adjust sampling logistics and board work of scientific crew for subsequent cruises of the project ‘Physical-biological processes in river plume fronts of the Mexican Pacific’.

Report objective

The aim of this report is to present the study area of the project and the vertical structure of the Santigo’s river plume during January 2016, including temperature, salinity, density anomaly, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity. As well as the geographic location of continuous measurements in surface transects of temperature, salinity, density anomaly, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity.

In order to use the information in this report, a written permission from project responsible Dr. Emilio A. Inda-Díaz is required (eindad@uan.edu.mx).

Study area

The reported data were obtained in the area of Santiago’s river mouth in the Nayarit continental shelf region, from the coastline to approximately 25 km (Figure 1), between 21º42’00” N-20º30’00’’ N and 105º30’00’’ W-104º15’00’’ W. Table 1 summarizes the geographic location, depth, date and time of occupation of the hydrographic stations. Table 2 summarizes date, time, initial position, final position and length of continuous surface transects.


[Figure ID: f1] Figure 1.

Study area and geographic position of stations and transects.


Table 1.

Geographic position of CTD stations of PROFRENTES-00 campaing. Station data are cast sequential number, name, position, local hour date and depth (m)


CAST STATION LATITUDE (ºN) LONGITUDE (ºW) HOUR (Local) DATE (mm/dd/yyyy) Station DEPTH (m)
230 1 21.6343 -105.4572 11:39:30 01/20/2016 5.4
231 2 21.6338 -105.4568 11:45:39 01/20/2016 5.4
232 3 21.6338 -105.4568 11:51:00 01/20/2016 5.4
233 4 21.6337 -105.4568 12:26:15 01/20/2016 5.4
235 5 21.5449 -105.5549 14:27:05 01/20/2016 37
236 6 21.5437 -105.5537 18:37:52 01/20/2016 39.24
238 7 21.5821 -105.516 21:44:36 01/20/2016 17.28
240 8 21.6337 -105.457 00:12:27 01/21/2016 5.9

Table 2.

Date, hour, starting position, final position of continuous surface transects


Cast Transect S t a r t i n g Latitude (ºn) S t a r t i n g Longitude (ºw) Final Latitude (ºn) Final Longitude (ºw) S t a r t i n g Hour (Local) Final Hour (Local) Date
229 1 21.5417 -105.3356 21.6347 -105.4569 09:47:36 11:34:50 01/20/2016
234 2 21.6328 -105.4583 21.5449 -105.5549 13:13:43 14:21:50 01/20/2016
237 3 21.5462 -105.5496 21.5821 -105.516 21:18:59 21:44:36 01/20/2016
239 4 21.5856 -105.5119 21.6337 -105.4570 23:22:00 23:50:21 01/20/2016

Methods

Instruments and Calibration

This section describes the calibration and data acquisition of the SBE-911plus CTD (SCPlusV2_ RS232) manufactured by Sea Bird Electronics, Inc., serial number (01907465), which consists of a submari ne unit (SBE-911 plus). The SBE-911 unit consists of a pressure box (up to 6800 m deep capacity), containing power sources and electronics for data acquisition and telemetry, in addition to the pressure sensor. Outside there are modular sensors for temperature (SBE 3plus premium), pressure (Digiquartz® Pressure sensor), and conductivity (SBE 4C), which are fed by a constant spe ed pump controlled seawater flow (30 mls-1). The unit provides up to eight input channels to connect optional sensors; during PROFRENTES-00 campaign extra sen sors were used for dissolved oxygen (SBE 43), fluores cence (Fluorometer WET Labs WETstar), and turbidity (Turbidity Meter Seapoint).

CTD Calibration

The processes for pressure, temperature, conductivity and dissolved oxygen sensors calibration in laboratory have been described by Godínez et al., (1995). Table III presents coefficients of the manufacturer’s calibration for temperature (T), salinity (S), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence (Fl) and turbidity (Tz) used sensors.

CTD Data Acquisition

The obtained data with temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity sensors were stored in the internal memory of the unit, both in the vertical profiles and transects. Additionally, in the surface transects, they were stored in real time in a computer on deck connected to a load data cable (Sea- Bird Wet-pluggable Load-Bearing data cable MCIL-4FS to DB-9S, 100 m). The technical specifications given by the manufacturer for each sensor are shown in Table 4.

Table 3.

Calibration coefficients of sensors. D depth (m), T temperature (ºT), C Conductivity (S/m), DO Dissolved oxygen (mL/L), Fl Fluorescence (μg/L), Tz Turbidity (NTU).


Coefficient D T C DO Fl Tz
Calibration Date 01/17/2014 01/22/2014 01/22/2014 02/01/2014 08/01/2013 08/01/2013
Serial number 01907465 01907465 01907465 2820 WS3S-835P 1955
Slope 1.00000000 1.00000000 1.00000000
Offset 0.0000 0.0000 0.00000 -0.4929
a 2.02902600e+000 1.23902368e- 003 -9.98299700e-001 -2.6753e-003
b -6.80672200e+001 2.76802378e- 004 1.43990000e-001 1.3612e-004
c 5.24449000e+005 -1.31191594e- 006 2.78030100e-004 -2.9724e-006
d 2.50907500e+001 1.89435487e- 007 4.06718800e-005 2.5826e+000
Cpcor - 9 . 5 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 e - 0081.00000000
CTcor 3.2500e-006
Cell Const 2000.000
WBOTC 0.00000000e+000
Boc 0.0000
Soc 4.7119e-001
Pcor 0.00e+000
Tcor 0.0000
Tau 1.0900
Scale Factor 1.00000000e+001 20.000000
Vblank 0.0540
Dark Voltage 0.076000

Table 4.

CTD sensor specifications as given by the manufacturer (Sea Bird Electronics).


SENSOR RANGE PRECISION RESOLUTION (24 Hz) STABILITY RESPONSE TIME
Pressure 0-10,500 m ± 0.015% of full scale 0.001% of full scale ± 0.02%or full year scale 0.015 s
Temperature -5-35ºC ± 0.001 °C 0.0002 °C 0.0002 °C per month 0.065 s
Conductivity 0-7 S/m ± 0.0003 S/m 0.00004 S/m 0.0003 S/m per month 0.065 s
Fluorescence 0.03-75 μg/L 0.03 μg/I 0.125 s
Turbidity 25-4000 NTU 200-2 (mV/NTU) 0.125 s

Vertical profiles were measured by manually lowering the CTD at ~0.5 meters per second. For continuous surface transects, the CTD was placed in an ad hoc wooden box (1 m x 0.5 m x 0.5 m) of 250 L, which was fed with seawater pumped at 1 m depth (750 L/min), the residence time of seawater was 20 seconds, and navigation speed 6 knots.

Data processing

The 7.26.7 version of SBE Data Processing© (Sea-Bird Electronics) was used for data processing. This software consists of modules to convert, edit, process and graph oceanographic data obtained with the Sea-Bird 911plus CTD, and is part of the Seasoft V2 software suite 2017 (http://www.seabird.com/software/sbe-data-processing).

Data were downloaded and processed to obtain profiles of measured parameters (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity) as well as density (derived). During the data processing the ‘noise’ was reduced, errors eliminated, and calculations were made to finally obtain values at every 0.1 m depth. All “raw” data recorded by the CTD during the cast were processed and converted to conventional units using DATCNV module. Due to the high vertical (profiles) and horizontal (transects) variation in coastal shallow data, the process suggested by the manufacturer (Sea-Bird Electronics, 2017a) was modified on an empirical basis and the WILDEDIT module was not used.

Due to differences in response time of each sensor, the first step for data processing was to advance measurements using the ALIGNCTD module in 0.05 s temperature and conductivity, 5 s dissolved oxygen, and 0.11 s fluorescence and turbidity. This delay is independent of that due to sensors’ conduit position (0.073 s; Sea-Bird INC, 1992), which was automatically adjusted when configuring the SBE-911plus control unit.

To eliminate depth inconsistencies due to boat pitching and manual descent/ascent of the CTD, the data were adjusted in the LOOPEDIT module. All data were maintained (from the surface). Data obtained with a CTD speed of less than 0.1 m were eliminated.

The next step was reduction of undesirable ‘noise’ (due to different sensor responses) through the FILTER module, using a single pole low-pass filter with a constant of 10 s for temperature, conductivity, fluorescence, dissolved oxygen and turbidity. This filtering is based on the criterion of visually minimizing peak salinity profiles (Morrison et al., 1994). Finally, data were averaged in centered 0.1 m blocks using the BINA VG module.

The reported temperature used to derive variables is ITS-90, the salinity is UPS, density is calculated from the seawater state equation according to the UNESCO proposal (1991) and density anomaly is reported γθ (kg•m3). The used algorithm to calculate dissolved oxygen concentration uses the Owens and Millard equation (1985). All these algorithms are performed internally by software provided by (Sea-Bird Electronics, 2017b; http://www.seabird.com/software/sbe-data-processing).

To locate errors that have not been eliminated using the procedures described above, a visual inspection was carried out after the data had been processed. Most of the errors are due to communication failure between the CTD and computer, sometimes they could be due to lack of time to sensors’ stabilization at surface, however, for this campaign a special care has been taken to stabilize sensors due to the high vertical and horizontal variation in the physical properties measured in river plumes. These errors are eliminated by editing the original files, reviewing the process, and if necessary is repeated completely.

Resultados

The processed data of CTD cast are presented in Annex 7.1, general data, tabulated physical variables data and vertical profiles. The surface continuous transects are presented in Annex 7.2, in addition to the general and tabulated data, a time series for measured physical variables averaged each second is presented. The symbols used in the profiles are described in Table 5.

Table 5.

Used abbreviations in CTD vertical profiles headers.


VERTICAL PROFILES TRANSECTS
VARIABLE ABBREVIATION VARIABLE ABBREVIATION
Station St Transect Tr
Cast Ct Cast Ct
Latitude (ºN) Lat Starting Latitude (ºN) Lat_St
Longitude (ºW) Lon Starting Longitude (ºW) Lon_St
Date (mm-dd-yyyy) Date Final Latitude (ºN) Lat_Fn
Hour (hr:mm:ss) Hr Final Longitude (ºW) Lon_Fn
Station Depth (m) St_z Date (mm-dd-aaaa) Date
Depth (m) z Hour (hr:mm:ss) Hr
Potential temperature (ºC) Temp Time (s) Sec
Salinity Sal Potential temperature (ºC) Temp
Density anomaly (kg/m3) Dens Salinity Sal
Dissolved oxygen (mL/L) DO Density anomaly (kg/m3) Dens
Fluorescence (μg/L) Fl Dissolved oxygen (mL/L) DO
Turbidity (NTU) Tz Fluorescence (μg/L) Fl
Turbidity (NTU) Tz

In addition, below there is a T-S diagram with data of all vertical sets from PROFRENTES-00 oceanographic campaign in front of the Boca del Asadero, in the plume area of the river.


[Figure ID: f2] Figure 2.

T-S diagram from all CTD cast of the PROFRENTES-00 campaign. Colors are depth (m).



[Figure ID: f3] Figure 3.

T-S diagrams of CTD stations of PROFRENTES-00 campaign. Colors are (a) dissolved oxygen (ml/l), (b) turbidity (NTU), (c) fluorescence (μg/L).



1.

fn1Cite this paper/Como citar este artículo: Inda-Díaz E. A., Romero-Bañuelos C. A., Cepeda-Morales J., Hernández Almeida O. U., Largier J. Bernal-Jaspeado T. S. (2018). Technical report of the Oceanographic Cruise Profrentes-00 in the Nayarit coast (january 20-21, 2016). Revista Bio Ciencias 5, e376. doi: https://doi.org/10.15741/revbio.05.e376

Acknowledgments

This work is part of the project 'Procesos físico-biológicos en frentes de pluma de río del Pacífico Mexicano' (Conacyt: I010/532/2014 MOD.ORD/42/2014 CB-2014-01 241916) . It also gives special recognition to the students of the Biological Oceanography Laboratory and Environmental Toxicology Laboratory of the Autonomous University of Nayarit. We thank all the people who helped with any interest to carry out this campaign. Special thanks to Eng. Fidencio Serrano Estrada "Otates," captain of B/O "Don Emilio M. González," and to the students of the National School of Fishing Engineering, who worked as part of the crew. To the National School of Fishing Engineering of the Autonomous University of Nayarit, and in general to all the instances and institutions that made the successful realization of this campaign.

Appendix
Annex 1.

St 01 Ct 230 Lat 21.6343 Lon -105.4572
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 11:39:30 St_z 5.4
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 23.3662 9.5383 4.6248 5.4093 9.381 0.8331 2.3506
0.20 23.7012 14.7111 8.4326 5.11 9.379 1.3165 3.576
0.30 23.7973 16.3008 9.6026 5.0132 9.379 1.4741 3.9777
0.40 23.8554 17.2966 10.3357 4.9465 9.378 1.5902 4.2737
0.50 23.9088 18.2338 11.0259 4.8803 9.377 1.7152 4.5918


[Figure ID: f4]

St 02 Ct 230 Lat 21.6338 Lon -105.4568
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 11:45:39 St_z 5.4
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 23.9615 4.9842 1.0544 5.4125 9.368 0.9699 2.5444
0.20 23.0803 11.3662 5.8222 4.8179 9.375 2.2099 5.093
0.30 23.1389 13.3627 7.3076 4.6218 9.377 2.4483 5.346
0.40 23.1942 15.426 8.8432 4.4019 9.378 2.662 5.5557
0.50 23.4036 24.0998 15.3079 3.5979 9.393 3.3508 6.1425


[Figure ID: f5]

St 02 Ct 232 Lat 21.6338 Lon -105.4568
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 11:51:00 St_z 5.4
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 23.733 8.2293 3.5544 5.3933 9.419 0.9483 4.1635
0.20 24.0083 16.1846 9.469 4.8515 9.426 2.0334 5.3248
0.30 24.1309 20.9805 13.0433 4.4259 9.43 2.7257 4.6062
0.40 24.1577 22.5084 14.1853 4.2753 9.432 2.8802 4.4603
0.50 24.4154 32.0477 21.2892 3.774 9.474 3.8835 3.9335


[Figure ID: f6]

St 04 Ct 233 Lat 21.6337 Lon -105.4568
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 11:51:00 St_z 5.4
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 23.8645 6.4743 2.197 5.376 9.455 4.0204 12.3835
0.20 24.0478 14.2888 8.0288 4.7355 9.465 4.8049 15.6946
0.30 24.0814 15.3018 8.7815 4.6476 9.466 4.6475 14.8887
0.40 24.1441 17.2884 10.2582 4.4699 9.466 4.3718 13.4586
0.50 24.3632 24.1354 15.3469 3.8566 9.471 3.5953 9.1316


[Figure ID: f7]

St 05 Ct 233 Lat 21.5449 Lon -105.5549
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 14:27:05 St_z 37
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 24.3137 6.412 2.0353 5.3699 9.534 5.3596 7.3831
0.20 24.6979 11.0042 5.3881 5.0557 9.542 8.2241 10.625
0.30 24.7981 12.1348 6.2101 4.969 9.543 7.8907 9.9024
0.40 24.8911 13.336 7.0865 4.8776 9.544 7.3074 9.2809
0.50 24.0958 17.2262 9.9497 3.586 9.546 6.1433 8.2237


[Figure ID: f8]

St 06 Ct 236 Lat 21.5437 Lon -105.5537
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 18:37:52 St_z 39.24
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 24.8405 14.1023 7.6738 5.0605 9.371 0.1911 0.4118
0.20 25.003 17.6818 10.3188 4.8678 9.38 0.2452 0.461
0.30 25.0469 18.6741 11.0514 4.8091 9.383 0.262 0.4768
0.40 25.08 19.4228 11.6041 4.7621 9.384 0.2762 0.4903
0.50 25.1187 20.3053 12.2555 4.7036 9.387 0.295 0.5057


[Figure ID: f9]

St 07 Ct 238 Lat 21.5821 Lon -105.516
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 18:37:52 St_z 17
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 24.8405 12.2567 6.2888 5.3852 9.454 0.3818 0.7059
0.20 24.003 17.4796 10.2116 5.2601 9.458 0.5642 0.9342
0.30 24.0469 19.0148 11.3645 5.2203 9.458 0.6246 1.0089
0.40 24.08 20.884 12.7682 5.1726 9.459 0.7188 1.1203
0.50 24.1187 24.1336 15.2086 5.0967 9.46 0.9365 1.365


[Figure ID: f10]

St 07 Ct 238 Lat 21.5821 Lon -105.516
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 18:37:52 St_z 17
z Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
0.10 23.9734 8.456 3.6678 5.3446 9.441 0.3818 9.2989
0.20 24.1542 17.3381 10.301 4.8585 9.444 0.5642 3.9182
0.30 24.1787 18.4805 11.1534 4.7905 9.444 0.6246 3.7622
0.40 24.1979 19.3736 11.8196 4.733 9.444 0.7188 3.6471
0.50 24.2123 20.0474 12.3221 4.687 9.443 0.9365 3.5634


[Figure ID: f11]


Annex 2 Transectos.

St 1 Ct 229 Lat_St 21.5417 Lon_St -105.3356
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 09:47:36 Lat_Fn 21.6347 Lon_Fn -105.4569
Sec Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
1 24.5598 30.2758 19.8118 4.802 8.894 1.2772 3.4625
2 24.5429 29.9572 19.5525 4.7765 8.899 1.2749 3.477
3 24.5229 29.5673 19.2362 4.7493 8.904 1.2722 3.4931
4 24.4985 29.1084 18.901 4.726 8.909 1.2691 3.5109
5 24.4677 28.694 18.6712 4.7092 8.915 1.2656 3.5306


[Figure ID: f12]

St 2 Ct 234 Lat_St 21.6328 Lon_St -105.4583
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 13:13:43 Lat_Fn 21.5449 Lon_Fn -105.5549
Sec Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
1 25.2242 31.1414 20.3255 4.8526 9.466 1.7212 13.1709
2 25.2231 31.0583 20.2538 4.8352 9.466 1.718 13.4443
3 25.2219 30.9562 20.1657 4.8166 9.467 1.7145 13.7018
4 25.2208 30.8305 20.0574 4.7991 9.467 1.7109 13.9319
5 25.2198 30.6897 19.9632 4.7834 9.467 1.7072 14.158


[Figure ID: f13]

St 3 Ct 237 Lat_St 21.5462 Lon_St -105.5496
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 21:18:59 Lat_Fn 21.5821 Lon_Fn -105.516
Sec Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
1 25.5861 33.9053 22.3355 3.3452 9.502 0.8517 6.9395
2 25.5825 33.9047 22.3362 3.4117 9.502 0.8534 6.9328
3 25.5782 33.9039 22.3369 3.4876 9.502 0.855 6.9162
4 25.5733 33.9029 22.3376 3.5734 9.502 0.8567 6.8849
5 25.5682 33.9015 22.338 3.6739 9.502 0.8584 6.8364


[Figure ID: f14]

St 4 Ct 239 Lat_St 21.5856 Lon_St -105.5029
Date 01/20/2016 Hr 20:23:32 Lat_Fn 21.6337 Lon_Fn -105.4567
Sec Temp Sal Dens DO pH Fl Tz
1 24.8655 33.1326 21.974 4.1661 9.466 1.5991 3.3201
2 24.8668 33.1395 21.9789 4.1743 9.465 1.5988 3.3223
3 24.8685 33.1479 21.985 4.185 9.465 1.5985 3.3258
4 24.8706 33.158 21.9923 4.1997 9.465 1.5982 3.3307
5 24.8731 33.1702 22.0014 4.2173 9.465 1.5977 3.3373


[Figure ID: f15]

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Revista Bio Ciencias, Año 12, vol. 8,  Enero 2021. Sistema de Publicación Continua editada por la Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”,  Col. Centro,  C.P.: 63000, Tepic, Nayarit, México. Teléfono: (01) 311 211 8800, ext. 8922. E-mail: revistabiociencias@gmail.com, revistabiociencias@yahoo.com.mx, http://revistabiociencias.uan.mx. Editor responsable: Dr. Manuel Iván Girón Pérez. No. de Reserva de derechos al uso exclusivo 04-2010-101509412600-203, ISSN 2007-3380, ambos otorgados por el Instituto Nacional de Derechos de Autor. Responsable de la última actualización de este número Dr. Manuel Iván Girón Pérez. Secretaria de Investigación y Posgrado, edificio Centro Multidisciplinario de Investigación Científica (CEMIC) 03 de la Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit. La opinión expresada en los artículos firmados es responsabilidad del autor. Se autoriza la reproducción total o parcial de los contenidos e imágenes, siempre y cuando se cite la fuente y no sea con fines de lucro.

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Revista Bio Ciencias por Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit se encuentra bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-SinObraDerivada 4.0 Internacional

Fecha de última actualización 08 de Febrero de 2021

 

licencia de Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-SinObraDerivada 4.0 Internacional